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German Possessive what is possessive article in german Adjectives 3 Steps to Mastering What’s Whose FluentU German
German Possessive what is possessive article in german Adjectives 3 Steps to Mastering What’s Whose FluentU German
You may have heard of possessive adjectives under a different name— possessive pronouns . We use these pronouns when we want to indicate possession in a German sentence , as shown in the example below. Ihre Schwester ist gerade im Restaurant. The best part is that FluentU keeps track of the vocabulary that you're learning, and gives you extra practice with difficult words. It'll even remind you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. Start on your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or Google Play stores. Ich habe meinem Vater die Krawatte gekauft. Kannst du deiner Freundin die Nachricht sagen? Want to know the key to learning German effectively? Finally, neuter words—including  Baby , Leben and Silber —will take  das . Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. Once you’re familiar with this list, you should have no trouble translating your English into the correct German word. Below are some examples of how you can use these words in sentences and wow others with your language skills. There’s another factor that could require you to change the ending of your possessive adjective—the sentence case . You can tap on any word to look it up instantly. Every definition has examples that have been written to help you understand how the word is used. If you see an interesting word you don't know, you can add it to a vocabulary list. Facing these words in German can be even more daunting, and you may find yourself wanting to ask a lot of questions about them. If you liked this post, something tells me that you'll love FluentU, the best way to learn German with real-world videos. After all, no one wants to mistakenly think something is theirs, only to find out it actually belongs to someone else. Masculine  nouns add on an -em to their possessive adjectives. In German, nouns are classed as being either masculine, feminine or neuter . The noun’s gender dictates which word it takes for its definite article. This is the easiest case to master, as the possessive adjectives will not change. However, you’ll have to learn how to spot the nominative case and its purpose. The possessive adjective in the above sentence is meinen . Watching a fun video, but having trouble understanding it? FluentU brings native videos within reach with interactive subtitles. I mean, most of us have probably at least been confused about  “who’s” and “whose” before, right? The dative case is quite hard to learn, just because each of the possessive adjectives changes its ending. But don’t be scared! It’s a super useful case to know—once you’re able to use it, you’ll notice you’ll be able to say a whole lot more! It changes the indirect object of the sentence and affects possessive adjectives like this: Während meiner Stunde bin ich eingeschlafen. FluentU brings English to life with real-world videos. Learning English becomes fun and easy when you learn with movie trailers, music videos, news and inspiring talks. So there we have it—German possessive adjectives! The nominative case also follows the verb  sein   . Neuter  nouns also require the addition of an -em . And FluentU isn't just for watching videos. It's a complete platform for learning. It's designed to effectively teach you all the vocabulary from any video. Swipe left or right to see more examples of the word you're on. After studying German and Philosophy at The University of Nottingham,   Laura Harker   relocated to Berlin in 2012. She now works as a freelance writer and is also assistant editor at   Slow Travel Berlin . It’s important to point out that all possessive adjectives follow this same pattern, making this one of the parts of German that’s super easy to learn —you’ll become a pro in no time! So if you wanted to say: “Her mother is called Anna” the  ihr   would follow the same pattern as  mein   and have an e added to it: German Possessive what is possessive article in german Adjectives 3 Steps to Mastering What’s Whose FluentU German
German Possessive what is possessive article in german Adjectives 3 Steps to Mastering What’s Whose FluentU German
Leider hat sie ihre Hausaufgaben vergessen. All of these words we use to explain ownership can be tricky for us, even in English. The object of the sentence—the thing that’s receiving the verb’s action—takes the accusative case. When a possessive adjective follows a masculine noun in this case, we need to add a new ending to it. It takes an extra -en , as shown below. These two-way prepositions are  an  , auf , hinter  , in  , neben  , what is possessive article in german über , unter  , vor   and zwischen  . Just think of the nominative case as the “naming” case—it’s used when we’re simply naming something. The subject of the sentence is always in the nominative case, as the sentence below shows. Check it out with the own your German learning! There are some prepositions that take either the  accusative or dative , depending on what exactly is going on in the sentence. If there’s movement in the sentence, and it can answer the question wohin?  , then it takes the accusative . There are eight possessive adjectives in German you should know: There are certain German  prepositions  that change the case of the noun that follows to accusative , including  durch   , entlang , für   , gegen   , ohne   , um   and wider . Die Fenster meines Haus es sind alle zu. Now you’ll never be confused about whose is whose again! As with the accusative case, there are some dative -specific prepositions: aus , außer  , bei  , mit  , nach , seit  , von  , zu   and gegenüber  . A masculine word, such as  Tag   , needs  der   . Now we’re up to our last case : the genitive . In this case, both masculine and neuter nouns take an -es ending on their possessive adjectives. When it comes to feminine, we just add -er . One extra detail to remember is that you also need to add an -s ending on to the noun itself when it is masculine or neuter: To see these possessive adjectives in action, the way native speakers use them all the time, try FluentU. FluentU takes real-world videos—like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks—and turns them into personalized language learning lessons .
It's using the right content and tools, ! Browse hundreds of videos, take endless quizzes and master the German language faster than you've ever imagine! FluentU is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc, or its affiliates. We also participate in other affiliate advertising programs for products and services we believe in. Possessive adjectives are all over the place, and knowing how to use them properly can ! There are also certain prepositions that will switch a case to the genitive . These are während ,  trotz  , statt/anstatt  , wegen  ,  innerhalb , außerhalb  , jenseits   and diesseits . Remember the two-way prepositions I mentioned earlier on? Well, we need to face up to them again! This time, however, remember that if they’re used in a sentence without any movement , they take the dative case. Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. When you’re considering which possessive adjective to use and how to use it, there are three factors to bear in mind. With interactive captions that give instant definitions, pronunciations and additional usage examples, plus fun quizzes and multimedia flashcards, FluentU is a complete learning package. For example, Frau is a feminine noun, so it takes die for its definite article. The gender of nouns also affects possessive articles. Just like definite articles, possessive articles will change as follows. what's the german word for water bottle